Information You Need to Document After an Accident

Even if you only suffer minor injuries, being in an accident can definitely shake you up. Documenting certain things after you’ve been involved in a car crash can help you later if you decide to pursue a claim for injuries suffered as a result of the accident. Information you collect can also help you with any insurance claim you plan to file.

What should I do first?

Before collecting information, do the following:

  • Stay at the scene. It’s important to always stay at the scene of an accident. Leaving is a crime.
  • Get your vehicle out of the way if possible. If it’s possible to move your vehicle without causing further damage, get it out of the way of oncoming traffic.
  • Call police and emergency medical assistance if necessary. The police report can be important to your claim. An ambulance should also be called if anyone has been injured.

What should I document after I’m involved in an accident?

You should document as much of the following as you can after an accident:

  • Information from other drivers and passengers involved in the accident. Collect names, phone numbers, addresses, email addresses and insurance information from other drivers involved in the accident. You should also get contact information from passengers.
  • Information about the cars involved in the accident. Get the make, model and color of the cars involved in the accident, and the license plate numbers.
  • Information from witnesses. If there were witnesses to the accident, make sure to get their full contact information as well.
  • Photos and other information about the scene of the accident. You want to capture photos of the scene of the accident, including anything that can help identify the location and the damage to your vehicle.
  • Information from the police officer responding to the accident. Get the police officer’s name, badge number or ID number, and phone number. It’s important that you obtain a copy of the police report, which should be ready a few days after your accident.

If you’ve been involved in an accident, remember that documentation of these details can play an important role if you decide to pursue an accident claim. You should also contact a Tennessee personal injury attorney to discuss your case and the options available to you.

Motorcycle Safety Saves Lives and Reduces Serious Injuries

There’s nothing like the feeling of freedom cruising down the highway on a motorcycle, but when it comes to motor vehicle crashes, being on a motorcycle becomes a huge detriment. Unlike a car, which provides a driver with some measure of protection, in a crash, a motorcycle provides the rider almost no protection.

According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2001 and 2008, there were more than 34,000 motorcycle crash fatalities and more than a million people were treated for nonfatal motorcycle-related injuries.

Motorcycle safety tips

If you ride a motorcycle, following these safety tips can reduce your risk of injury and the severity of injury should you become involved in an accident:

  • Always use a helmet with a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) label.
  • Wear protective gear to reduce the severity of lacerations or abrasions in the event of an accident.
  • Clothing covering your upper body should be brightly colored or have reflective materials to make you more visible to other drivers.
  • If your helmet doesn’t have a face shield, wear protective eye gear.
  • Don’t mix riding with alcohol.
  • Follow traffic rules and regulations.
  • Don’t tailgate.
  • Don’t ride between lanes of traffic when traffic is slow or stopped.

Tennessee motorcycle safety laws

The following motorcycle safety measures are required by Tennessee laws:

  • Daytime use of headlights
  • Use of eye protection
  • Left and right mirrors
  • Passenger footrest and seat, if carrying a passenger
  • Use of a safety helmet

The consequences of a motorcycle-related accident can be stressful and severe. If you’ve been involved in a motorcycle accident, consult with an experienced Tennessee motorcycle accident attorney to seek the best outcome for your case.

Motorcycle Safety Saves Lives and Reduces Serious Injuries

There’s nothing like the feeling of freedom cruising down the highway on a motorcycle, but when it comes to motor vehicle crashes, being on a motorcycle becomes a huge detriment. Unlike a car, which provides a driver with some measure of protection, in a crash, a motorcycle provides the rider almost no protection.

According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2001 and 2008, there were more than 34,000 motorcycle crash fatalities and more than a million people were treated for nonfatal motorcycle-related injuries.

Motorcycle safety tips

If you ride a motorcycle, following these safety tips can reduce your risk of injury and the severity of injury should you become involved in an accident:

  • Always use a helmet with a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) label.
  • Wear protective gear to reduce the severity of lacerations or abrasions in the event of an accident.
  • Clothing covering your upper body should be brightly colored or have reflective materials to make you more visible to other drivers.
  • If your helmet doesn’t have a face shield, wear protective eye gear.
  • Don’t mix riding with alcohol.
  • Follow traffic rules and regulations.
  • Don’t tailgate.
  • Don’t ride between lanes of traffic when traffic is slow or stopped.

Tennessee motorcycle safety laws

The following motorcycle safety measures are required by Tennessee laws:

  • Daytime use of headlights
  • Use of eye protection
  • Left and right mirrors
  • Passenger footrest and seat, if carrying a passenger
  • Use of a safety helmet

The consequences of a motorcycle-related accident can be stressful and severe. If you’ve been involved in a motorcycle accident, consult with an experienced Tennessee motorcycle accident attorney to seek the best outcome for your case.

Should Tennessee’s Texting Law Be Stronger?

Everyone knows that texting while driving can be dangerous, but despite this, some people still do it. What are the penalties for texting while driving in Tennessee? Well, if you’re caught texting while driving, the fine is $50, and points go on your license if you’ve violated another traffic law at the same time.

The question is, should Tennessee’s texting while driving law be stronger than it is currently? According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Tennessee’s texting law isn’t strong enough, and as a result, Tennessee does not receive any of the funds that the NHTSA is giving out to states with qualified distracted-driving laws.

To qualify for the NHTSA grant, a texting-while-driving law must include in its definition of “texting while driving” the act of sending or receiving electronic messages not only while your vehicle is in motion, but also when it’s not in motion. This means the law prohibits you from texting even when your vehicle has stopped. The law must also escalate penalties for repeat offenders, which Tennessee law currently doesn’t do.

This year, only seven states — Arkansas, Georgia, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island and West Virginia — and Guam were awarded the NHTSA texting-while-driving grants. In Georgia, drivers are prohibited from texting even when their vehicles are stopped.

Distracted driving, and texting while driving in particular, is often the cause of serious accidents. If you’ve suffered an injury as a result of an accident caused by texting while driving, speak with an experienced Tennessee car accident attorney who can advise you on your options.

The Disability Determination Process

If you’re applying for a Social Security Disability claim, you may find the disability determination process a little complex. How are disability determinations made, and how does a disability evaluation work for people who are seeking Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits?

According to the Social Security Administration, most SSD claims are processed through local Social Security Administration field offices and disability determination services, which are state agencies responsible for determining whether a person is disabled under the law.

Here’s what happens during the disability determination process:

  • Field office representatives receive your application, which you can submit in person, online, through the mail or by phone.
  • On your application, you provide a description of your disability, your treatment sources and any other information relevant to your impairment.
  • The field office verifies your nonmedical eligibility requirements, including information such as your age, your employment and marital status, and your Social Security coverage.
  • A disability determination services representative then works to obtain evidence of your disability, usually through your own treatment sources first, and then, if more evidence is required, through a consultative examination.
  • A determination of disability is made and your claim is sent back to the field offices.

If a determination of disability has been made, the Social Security Administration office computes the amount of the benefit to which you are entitled and begins paying your benefits. If you are not found to be disabled, you can appeal this determination.

Applying for a Social Security Disability claim can be confusing and complex. Call a Tennessee Social Security claims attorney who can guide you through the process and help you get the benefits to which you are entitled.

Should Tennessee’s Texting Law Be Stronger?

Everyone knows that texting while driving can be dangerous, but despite this, some people still do it. What are the penalties for texting while driving in Tennessee? Well, if you’re caught texting while driving, the fine is $50, and points go on your license if you’ve violated another traffic law at the same time.

The question is, should Tennessee’s texting while driving law be stronger than it is currently? According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Tennessee’s texting law isn’t strong enough, and as a result, Tennessee does not receive any of the funds that the NHTSA is giving out to states with qualified distracted-driving laws.

To qualify for the NHTSA grant, a texting-while-driving law must include in its definition of “texting while driving” the act of sending or receiving electronic messages not only while your vehicle is in motion, but also when it’s not in motion. This means the law prohibits you from texting even when your vehicle has stopped. The law must also escalate penalties for repeat offenders, which Tennessee law currently doesn’t do.

This year, only seven states — Arkansas, Georgia, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island and West Virginia — and Guam were awarded the NHTSA texting-while-driving grants. In Georgia, drivers are prohibited from texting even when their vehicles are stopped.

Distracted driving, and texting while driving in particular, is often the cause of serious accidents. If you’ve suffered an injury as a result of an accident caused by texting while driving, speak with an experienced Tennessee car accident attorney who can advise you on your options.